Television

Roush Review: A Mother’s Grief Turns Into Activism in ‘Women


master mentalism tricks

Hell hath no fury like a mother grieving an unjustly slain son, and few had the lasting social impact of Mamie Till-Mobley. Airing over three Thursdays (continuing January 13 and 20), Women of the Movement is primarily Mamie’s story, about a woman who helped ignite the Civil Rights Movement after her sorrow hardens into a grim resolve to not let her murdered 14-year-old boy be forgotten.

This is the sort of socially conscious, emotionally driven miniseries that used to be a staple of broadcast TV before the format drifted to cable and, more recently, to streaming. While Women isn’t particularly adventurous in its by-the-history-books storytelling, Tony winner Adrienne Warren (Tina Turner in Tina) grounds the series with a powerfully impassioned performance as Mamie, a doting single mother facing her worst nightmare after she lets her beloved Emmett (earnest, exuberant Cedric Joe) travel from progressive Chicago to Mississippi to visit his uncle in August 1955.

Women of the Movement ABC

(Credit: ABC/Matthew Sayles)

“You keep your whole head down,” she warns Emmett before he leaves. But that’s not his style, and when he fails to show proper humility to a white female shopkeeper in the Jim Crow South, his fate is sealed. The circumstances of his murder by vengeful racists are horrible, but Movement only truly begins once Mamie maneuvers to retrieve and ship his disfigured body back home, where she insists on a public wake and an open casket that would be viewed by more than 10,000 spectators.

“I want them to see what was taken from me,” Mamie declares, as young Emmett becomes a viscerally visible symbol of racism’s evil. The ensuing trial, before an all-white jury in a courthouse with no “colored” restrooms, is as infuriating to watch as it is laboriously dramatized over several episodes. While Mamie’s frustration grows, she is urged by NAACP supporters to “just keep showing up.” Local civil rights leader Dr. T.R.M. Howard (Alex Désert) reminds her, “You are showing them that we do feel, that we…love like them.”

That much is never in doubt as Warren depicts Mamie’s evolution into a public figure, embarking on a speaking tour to control the narrative. She eventually begins to feel left behind when activists like Rosa Parks enter the scene, but no one could doubt Mamie played her part, ensuring that Emmett Till’s name endures well beyond those who so savagely took his life.

Women of the Movement, Limited Series Premiere, Thursday, January 6, 8/7c, ABC

Read The Full Article Here


trick photography
The 12 Best Lip Balms, Glosses & Treatments to Get
The Kardashians Are ‘Keeping Things Peaceful’ As They Co-Parent With
14 Actors Who Revealed They Had A Big Ol’ Crush
Megan Fox Hilariously Responded To A Comment Questioning The Whereabouts
Indiana Jones Is Back in Action in the ‘Dial of
Lynch/Oz review – Down the proverbial rabbit hole
‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol
The Worst Netflix Movies Of 2022
7 ‘Spirited’ Musical Numbers You’ll Be Humming All Day Long
It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Murder Exclusive Clip:
‘The Sex Lives of College Girls’ Team Previews Season 2
Ohio State vs. Michigan Football Feud Explored in ‘RIVALS’ Documentary
Stevie Nicks and Mick Fleetwood Pay Tribute to Christine McVie
Billboard and VIBE Discuss the Rémy Martin Impact and Excellence
Taylor Bennett Opens Up in Sound Mind’s Latest Episode of
Houston police arrest suspect in murder of Takeoff
7 Wardrobe Classics That Look So Much Better Secondhand
33 Expensive-Looking Knitwear Buys From & Other Stories, Arket and
Kendall Jenner Cutting Cucumber Costume Goes Viral
We’re Beauty Directors—These 12 Mega-Famous Products Changed Us
Celebrated Psychedelic Horror a Wounded Fawn — Out on Shudder
No Preview
World War II Werewolf Film ‘Operation Blood Hunt’ is “Predator
‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ Opens the Gas Station for Business and
The Gruesomely Gorgeous Art of Rhiannon Kagoe [Giallo Julian’s Indie
December 2022 Horoscopes and Book Recommendations
Interview with B. D. Panthona, Author of Coven Of the
Award-Winning Coming-Of-Age Story Set Amidst China’s Cultural Revolution
Interview with Ciara Blume, Author of Rome for the Holidays